And We’re Back

It’s been a long, hot summer and my summer session was brutal but I managed to survive. Now my Photoshop skills are sharper, I’ve got three more pieces for my portfolio and I only have one class left to graduate. Autumn has officially started and as part of my class this semester I will be creating an online portfolio. I’m still in the process of building it but I will be sure to let everyone know when it goes live.

Now for some awesome art.

Orbit exhibit
When I first saw this article on Laughing Squid I thought it was a conceptual rendering of a proposed project but this is real. Venturing out on the net high above the ground and the other patrons must be breathtaking. The whole museum looks like a scene from the future.

Plant blueprints
Macoto Murayama painstakingly dissected a few plants and using photos, Photoshop and 3D modeling software he created these awesome blueprints.

New Van Gogh
I heard about this painting on the Science Friday podcast and it’s a fascinating story of a lost masterpiece which wasn’t really lost.

That’s all for this week folks.

In the interest of managing time and prioritizing the different aspects of my life I will only publish on Mondays with the possibility of a Thursday post if something extraordinary comes up.

Have a great week!

The Art World is the Whole World

Today I’ve got some awesome art to share.
First up is Peter Gric. His hand painted masterpieces will blow your mind. “Cortex” is one of my favorites. Some of his work seems directly influenced by H.R. Geiger, but I think the imaginary landscapes are his best work. Don’t miss this video.

Where Peter Gric is a master of the brush, Werner Hornung is a master of the pixel. Ironically, Hornung’s website is dismal, especially next to Gric’s, but the digital images he creates are amazing. I like “Going Through Life with a One Way Ticket” the best. The composition and the colors convey a sense of motion with the stages of life depicted as a moving circle.

And now for great art by my buddies.

I’ve watched Matt Morcher go from tagging around town to painting colorslposions on canvas. Recently he successfully morphed into a new style still rooted in color, like Jackson Pollock but more intentional.

Another artist whose growth from hobbyist to professional I’ve been privileged to witness is Tyler Ristow, or Pharo if he’s making music. Tyler creates unbelievable visionary landscapes and sometimes creates his masterpieces at live music shows.

For the full treatment, check Tyler on Facebook.

Hope y’all enjoy the art and I encourage everyone to go to a museum, scour the web, seek out amazing art.
Life is better with art.

Summertime!

As promised, here is the PDF of the book I made for the final project in Design Communication 1 – The Joy of Disc Golf

I cut and pasted images and text from the internet for filler, but I also created some of my own graphics, photos, and copy. I really enjoyed this project and I picked up some new insight into the process of putting a book together. I’ve had a love affair with books since before I can remember, but I never really thought about how hard it is to design a book from cover to cover.

I also finished up with Digital Publishing 2 which is focused on Adobe InDesign. One major project was broken up into sections throughout the semester and we built a publication about tea. The final step of the project turned the print publication into an ePub.

With the skills I learned from these two classes I feel confident I could create a book and get it on the web in a digital form, now if only I had a story…

My Friend Flickr

I was never much of a photog before when taking pictures meant having to lug around a camera. Now I have a camera in my pocket all the time and a different problem has arisen, too many photos. I use iCloud and Dropbox to store photos to free up memory on my phone. Problem solved. I spend a fair amount of time commuting on foot which provides ample opportunity to snap pictures of found art or graffiti. This is an artsy town so I started a Flickr account to store photos of graffiti I come across in my wanderings.
This link to my Flickr photo stream is a direct line to the graffiti I find around town. All of the pictures (except the one of Jimi Hendrix with a bushy afro) I took myself. I could elucidate more here, but I include fairly detailed descriptions of each photo on Flickr.
Save the URL from the link a above to check in from time to time as I’ll add more shots of art around town as I find it.
Or, here’s the RSS link if you’re into that sort of thing.

C’est Magnifique

I’ve never had a desire to know French until now. Jean Francois Rauzier is an artist who uses thousands of images to create what he calls ‘hyperphoto’. The images he creates are stunning, collage is not even in the same category with the blended image masterpieces created by this artist.

I’ve mentioned my bibliophilia before so it should be no surprise I particularly enjoyed the ideal libraries.

I endeavored to find more info about J.F. Rauzier but his whole web presence is in French which makes sense because he is from France but makes it hard for me to gather information. Chrome will translate the French for me but I don’t think it’s really conveying the message.

Fortunately for me his images are beautiful in any language and inspire me to hone my Photoshop skills.

One mans trash is another mans art

Recycling doesn’t have to be boring. Besides the ecological benefits, recycling can also mean repurposing and the repurpose doesn’t have to be for any purpose other than art.
There is a great amount of art which finds itself relegated to the junk heap, but these folks are making art from the junk heap.

Here is a collection of great art made from the detritus of our civilization.

James McNabb uses cast away bits of wood from his designer furniture shop to make art reflecting on the transition from rural to urban culture.

In my own backyard, the Cathedral of Junk is a structure built entirely of junk. This is no pile of trash, this is a look at America and our culture through the lens of our no-longer-wanted stuff. Blind to the inherent aesthetic and cultural qualities, the city wants to tear it down.

Not all trash is created equal, some wil merely end up in a landfill, some will become valuable works of art.

What a colorful world

As a child my favorite color was black. Fearing something wrong with me my mom tried to get me to like other colors. I thought navy and purple were pretty good, but when I finally got old enough to decide for myself, black won out.

Now I appreciate the entire range of color my eyes can perceive yet black is still my favorite because of the effect it has on other colors. And all the cool guys wear black.

Future Art

I grew up in a land without the Internets or cell phones. Sure, TVs were ubiquitous, but we still had land lines and monochrome. I never could have imagined where we are today. I’m writing this on my phone on my front patio. The only time I need a wire is to charge the battery and I get Retina quality colors. So I forgive myself for not seeing the possibilities for art in this digital age. I’ve been using 21st century technology, with a 20th century mindset. What has this technology done to our brains, our evolution, our culture? How can our art reflect this change?
Now, I can’t really remember how we managed to survive in a wired world. If I had to rely on a home phone and an answering machine I would never see anyone unless by chance. We have evolved as the tech has evolved. Then I couldn’t imagine now, now I can’t imagine then.

Check out this article about the future of art.